The problem of unreasonable deplatforming is caused by more than Silicon Valley....

We must discuss copyright reform. While protecting your ownership of works is great, it has unfortunately become one of the greatest weapons used to take down even the most perfectly law-abiding critics and creators as of recent. Some examples include Alex (I Hate Everything), who got DMCA'd by Derek Savage, the creator of Cool Cat, for creating a review perfectly within Fair Use law that criticized his work, and Gavin McInnes, who got banned by YouTube for "copyright infringement" a day after Glenn Beck fired him. Not to mention R.E.M.'s more recent copyright strike on a video retweeted by President Donald Trump, which one of their founding members Mike Mills admitted was completely within fair use.

There is no doubt that Creative Commons licenses are a good patch for works that are available to the general public. However, it is not a full-on fix necessarily.

For a good starting guide on what a fair and balanced copyright policy should be like, people should view this document from Public Knowledge. It may be from 2012, but it is still more relevant than ever to today's battle for preserving freedom of speech on the internet. https://www.publicknowledge.org/documents/principles-for-a-balanced-copyright-policy

The problem of unreasonable deplatforming is caused by more than Silicon Valley.... We must discuss copyright reform. While protecting your ownership of works is great, it has unfortunately become one of the greatest weapons used to take down even the most perfectly law-abiding critics and creators as of recent. Some examples include Alex (I Hate Everything), who got DMCA'd by Derek Savage, the creator of Cool Cat, for creating a review perfectly within Fair Use law that criticized his work, and Gavin McInnes, who got banned by YouTube for "copyright infringement" a day after Glenn Beck fired him. Not to mention R.E.M.'s more recent copyright strike on a video retweeted by President Donald Trump, which one of their founding members Mike Mills admitted was completely within fair use. There is no doubt that Creative Commons licenses are a good patch for works that are available to the general public. However, it is not a full-on fix necessarily. For a good starting guide on what a fair and balanced copyright policy should be like, people should view this document from Public Knowledge. It may be from 2012, but it is still more relevant than ever to today's battle for preserving freedom of speech on the internet. https://www.publicknowledge.org/documents/principles-for-a-balanced-copyright-policy
[–] picman 1 point

The problem is the power to control copywrite was given to the federal government. Thus, as all things government do, it gets corrupted, used and abused by those with the power to do so (corps).

I don't think the issue with controlling copyright necessarily has to do with what level of government is in charge of it. I think it has more to do with how today's politicans (on both sides of the political spectrum) easily bend over to large corporations and their unelected lobbyists.

[–] picman 1 point

Exactly. The government officials are bending to the will of the corps. Why are the corps going after them? Because they weild such overreaching power that the corps only have to corrupt a few politicians and they're good to go.

If the government did not have such power, there would be no point in trying to bribe them.