Opened a fidelity roth IRA account

For many months, once a month, it pulled out $50 from my checking out.

This accumulated to $2500, the minimum to start investing (via fidelity).

I bought into the fidelity 500 index fund.

I've made about $100 in a couple weeks doing absolutely nothing.

I'm sure the market will drop at some point. Can't be discouraged, but must invest wisely.

Would recommend.

Opened a fidelity roth IRA account For many months, once a month, it pulled out $50 from my checking out. This accumulated to $2500, the minimum to start investing (via fidelity). I bought into the fidelity 500 index fund. I've made about $100 in a couple weeks doing absolutely nothing. I'm sure the market will drop at some point. Can't be discouraged, but must invest wisely. Would recommend.
[–] RepublicOfTX 3 points (+3|-0)

Good to always remember that you own "shares" of a fund or stock, that happen to be worth a particular dollar value at any given point in time; you only "lose money" if a) you sell below what you bought it for (and IMO if you sell it for less appreciation than the risk-free rate) or b) the company (stock) or mutual fund company (fund) goes bankrupt (the latter highly unlikely).

[–] anmanindustries 3 points (+3|-0)

Now is the worst time to put money into market index funds. Specially index funds. Index funds move the worst when there is market corrections and there is a big one trying to happen. (EG, crash). It has correctly significantly over the last few months, but that correction only goes back a year or two. It has another 8 years to go. Give or a take a year for inflation.

People will pull all their money out of those stocks or commodities or index funds and put it into things like cash investments, gold and silver resources and miners, bonds and small cap items where there isnt much room to go down in.

Last crash the ASX (australia stock exchange) ( I study the ASX the most because this is what effects our cash value) cut in half. Anyone holding index funds in australia pretty much would have lost almost everything. Considering the ASX is a shadow of the US markets and I have spent a lot of time with AU and US markets in real time, the same will happen.

I will note that fidelity does have a reputation of stopping out of investments when things go sour, but its always at a cost. But to lose half your money than all of it.

[–] JoeKerr 1 point (+1|-0)

Key rule investing: diversify your portfolio

[–] anmanindustries 1 point (+1|-0)

Correct. I also like people to ensure that they invest in non marketable things too. For example, solar panels are also a financial investment. In the end, you can still lose EVERYTHING you have in the market, no matter how diverse, when your main currency dies. Or the internet.

[–] Aragorn 1 point (+1|-0)

Interesting, thanks

[–] anmanindustries 1 point (+1|-0)

I just checked in on one of my side business partners who trades the DOW index as a day trader. Extremely volatile at the moment. Pretty much in line what I see with the ASX. ASX is a lot worse at the moment he says though (I am currently not day trading so I am not spending much time on the inter day charts).

We have had two major movements (one the correction I mentioned, then an over compensation that reapplied that same correction). My main speciality is technical analysis and historical trading. I once analysed the last 4 market crashes and each time 3-5 major movements occurred in short succession. Looks like we are about to go into the third drop. I dont know what fidelities buy and sell time line is like, but I would sell out now and buy back in again shortly. Or not at all until it all finally dies. This is general advice, the markets are always variable. I have all my money out of long term top end stocks as I don't trade on uncertainty.

Do keep in mind though, the DOW top index has 50% of its value in like, 9 stocks. A 500 index would be a lot less volatile, but still very susceptible to crashes.

[–] PMYB2 2 points (+2|-0)

Well I might have to look into this later this year.

[–] Sw0rdofDamocles 1 point (+1|-0) Edited

Would I recommend investing to others? Only if they're living debt free, have a trade skill they can use to generate un-taxed productivity, have enough savings in a Credit Union, or bank, to cover several months living expenses, have a few grand in cash stashed away outside of a bank account in case they can't make withdrawals, a few grand in silver, gold, or copper stashed away in the event cash is no longer a viable exchange option and so on.

Would I recommend polar bears actively seek to educate themselves on investing? Most definitely.